My wheel. My life.

href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/wheel/”>Wheel</a&gt;


Take control of your steering wheel as you would take control of your life.

The moment you touch that wheel, you become the boss of your emotions, your thoughts, your words and your actions. Do not be overwhelmed with that power, though. Drive safely. If you don’t, there’s bound to be terrible consequences. The worst is the loss of your life or someone else’s.

Therefore, live your life safely. Take risks but use your common sense.

Move away from danger.

The wheel is life. Sometimes you’re up, at other times, you’re down.

Therefore, do not mock and judge people. One of them might get to the top of the wheel, wealthier, more famous and more successful than you.

Remember the golden rule. Believe in karma.

What we do and use to make wrong things right

(alluded to one particular leader of a land who thinks he can do anything with impunity)

Diversion:
-Constantly making up excuses or alibis. The attention is now drawn from what is actually wrong to proving the truthfulness of the alibi.

-Inferring from someone else’s experience. But, what has been right for someone may not be right for another.

-Knowing but not straightforwardly accepting that he is wrong. He cleverly fights back by pointing out the opponent’s wrongdoing instead.

Deception: Lying is not telling the truth outright. To deceive is cheating someone with a fabricated truth. That is double jeopardy.

Revenge/ Karma: The notion of “an eye for an eye’…

Beliefs:

-Customs and Traditions:  If one can accept and adapt to changes of the times, then there is no need to justify a traditional practice.

-Ideology:  Whatever society calls it and however it is applied, it does not necessarily determine that what is wrong is right and vice versa.

Social Media Misuse/Abuse
When one resorts to spreading and using  fake news. And using it further to proliferate a graphic image or an erroneous information about the purported enemy.

Charisma
Its power can drive supporters to blind loyalty and encourages them to acquiesce to any idea without reading between the lines. They would go as far as defending and shrugging off the use of foul and offending language. They would further tolerate inhumane practices.

When their enemy falters,  he is excessively  mocked, bashed and taunted personally and via social media.

Keeping allies as close as possible and at all costs. Knowing full well that as and when needed, they can be utilised to propagate the same convictions as the charismatic leader.

White lies.

 Wanting total freedom where there is total disregard for the law. Divine or human.

To blog or not to blog

img_1938-1

My daily routine of heading to work has been put on hold for sometime now. This has given me the opportunity to re-ignite hobbies of old: reading and writing. I was able to read those pocketbooks gathering dust on the shelf.  I unwrapped subscriptions of Reader’s Digests and read them all. To further pass the time, I completed browsing through a pile of travel brochures.

Coincidentally, I have had this  longing to write about my own culture after realising its slow demise and how much I have taken it for granted. Thankfully, I found an online community, Igorotage,  which interestingly caters to topics about my tribal roots. Perfect! I signed-up. My tagline: “I am passionate about keeping the Igorot culture alive”.

To blog:  When I started writing for Igorotage, my ‘creative juices’ kicked off! It paved the way for me to take courage,  reach out to more readers and learn the intricacies of blogging. This site, Opinions Matter,  came to life.

My first attempt to blog about my roots,  Hometown Fortress came into fruition.

The more I blogged, the more I wanted to write about anything and share my opinions from my heart’s point of view. Not only have I discovered that blogging is an avenue to  discover the eccentricities and convictions of other people but it has likewise widen my writing horizon.

To blog more: My determination to share my culture in writing has not waned, therefore, a separate site, www.benguetsite.wordpress.com has been created to highlight that goal.

I hope that through this specific site, I will be able to relay the significance of not just knowing but also remembering one’s culture and traditions. Hence, passing a priceless heritage to generations still to come.

Please click on Benguet Blogs in Menu to read about my life as a Kankanaey Igorota.

One Day. Two Stories.’Kevi and Santa’

img_2885-1
The weather maybe muggy today, but it's tempting not to stay indoors. So I decided to drive around and take photos of the town where I've lived for the last 13 years. Then I met Kevi and Santa. Here is the other story.  

I took a stroll into the woods and stopped  by a quiet stream to cool down. A dog was already there doing the same.  Its kind lady owner allowed me to take a photograph of her dog having fun.
img_2883-2

As I took the shot, my attention got diverted onto a couple at the shallow end of the stream. Their backs were turned to me and both were busy getting something from among the overgrown bushes in the water. This scene felt familiar. It took  me back to a river in a town where I grew up. What I needed to do now was to verify a wild guess!

The woman noticed me and signalled that I follow a narrow path leading to where she was standing.

Whoah! I was right! The couple was gathering fresh and (oh, well, call it organic) watercress! I knew it!

Watercress is called tungsoy in my Ilocano dialect.

Here's a flashback to my neighbourhood in La Trinidad, Benguet Philippines. Many residents plant watercress in a river for free! Then it was sold fresh and in bundles. By the way, for those who grew up in the same neighbourhood, they would know exactly what river I was referring to.

Back to the present: Where I currently live, watercress is packed and sold for making vegetable salads. Some people are not aware that it can either be sauteed or steamed.

The couple from Nepal spoke broken English but I was able to get their names; Kevi and Santa. They generously gave me a bagful of freshly picked watercress! From a stream where you'd never expect was teeming with such nutritious green.

Not unless you have the slightest idea, then you'd never know.

img_2688

 

 

 

 

Thank you, Kevi and Santa. Watercress happened to be one of my favourites. I hope we'll meet again.

Here is the first story in one day.






One Day. Two Stories. ‘Bernie’

img_2775

someone else’s lucky day


The weather may be muggy today but it’s tempting not to stay indoors. So I decided to drive around and take photos of the town where I’ve lived for the last 13 years. Then I met Bernie. This is his story.

My stop over was in a park with a large pond near my home. It must have been my lucky day! I just spotted a pair of swans frolicking in the water. What a good photo that would make!

Then I noticed that it was also someone else’s lucky day. He was not only clicking away with a camera slung around his neck but seemed to be chatting with the swans, too. Interesting!

img_2797

As I approached nearer, I found the man feeding the swans and their cygnets  with grass. Sensing my curiousity he explained, “They do eat grass but not any kind. They must be hand-cut and I’ve just given them dandelions. Try feeding them with that (pointing to the grass on the ground) and they will only spit it out.”

Here’s more: he must have read my mind. “The colour of the beak of the male is dark orange. The female beak is also orange but lighter.

They  used to have nine cygnets. One of them died and the other got injured so it  was taken away.”

img_2777-1

img_2773

Suddenly, the female swan (now I know) came closer to him. “Okay you’re still hungry. Here’s some bread.”

I thought, “Oh wow, carbs and veg, good for you swan.”

“I come here everyday”, he continued. I guess my face looks familiar to them. But I would not mess with them during the mating season. The male, especially, can become aggressive. “He hit my hand with his wing once and it put me out of action for four days!”

He then pointed to a heron perched on the concrete in the middle of the pond.

heron ready for take-off

He got amused with the coots trying to grab their share of the bread. He threw in some more. I thought, “carbs and veg, good for you, ducks!”

Finally, I found the chance to ask him his name. ‘Bernie’.

Bernie is an amiable old man. (Even the wild swans took to him, right?) The lines on his face reflect a happy human being.

Not only did he impart valuable ‘swan wisdom’ but also taught me how to identify the variety of birds residing in the pond. More importantly, Bernie gave my photos more meaning.

I have been to this pond several times but today was a chance encounter with a man who has a genuinely good heart. Indeed this was a lucky day!  I know I will see Bernie again one of these days. I drove away with a smile.

Here is The second story in one day.

Slow But Sure

Catapult

Isn’t it somewhat scary being catapulted to the top or to sudden success?  in our careers,  in our wealth or in any situation?
The unexpected jolt can cause us to lose our grip. Consequently, a faster and  uncontrollable downfall!
Wouldn’t you rather work and learn your way slowly but surely towards your goals? I believe that doing so will give one the ample time to hone the skills needed to reach them. We ought to take the steps and avoid being catapulted to the top by taking the lift. No shortcuts.

Catapulted into marriage? Nah. Don’t rush. Get to know that someone you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. Regrets come last.

Catapulted to an idea or a belief? Think! Breathe! Keep calm. Your opinion matters. Make a choice. You don’t need to conform.